Archive for the ‘Silent Night Zombie Night’ Category

Interview done by Michael Wilkerson

MW: Please introduce yourself?

CG: I’m Chris Gabriel, and I played Zombie Santa.

 

MW: How did you become a part of Silent Night, Zombie Night?

CG: Chad Freeman, one of the other zombies, told me that Sean was looking for a big fat dude to play a zombified Santa.  How could I pass that up?

 

MW: Tell me about a day on Silent Night, Zombie Night?

CG: Lots of fun – it always gets goofy when you have a bunch of people standing around in zombie costume.  Instead of doing “Thriller”, we did the Zombie Hustle.  I’m sure there must be footage of that.  Also, I got to freak out a bunch of little kids who didn’t know what to do with a zombie Santa.  I’m sure that their parents had to answer some difficult questions that night.  I’m just glad that I got to be a part of that….wait that sounds bad.

 

MW: Give me a story from the set of Silent Night, Zombie Night?

CG: I got hit in the back of the head with a chunk of PVC when the air cannon blew apart when (SPOILER ALERT) I got shot.

 

MW: What do you think of the craze of zombie movies? Do you think there is to many of them?

CG: I once read that these things follow political cycles.  When a Republican is in office, there tend to be more vampire movies.  When it’s a Democrat, it’s zombies.  I’m not sure what it means, but I think it’s something about the idea of republicans being blood sucking night stalkers and democrats being a plague of mindless, all-consuming automatons.  Personally, I think it’s because people want to see people get their heads blown off but they wouldn’t admit that in polite company so they watch it happen to zombies as sort of a proxy.  There is always some kind of social/political statement that you can extract from zombie movies, but really, sometimes a cigar is just a cigar, a whale is just a whale, and watching blood soaked survivors take chainsaws to slobbering monsters is a lot of fun.

MW: What is on tap for the future?

CG: The world is going to end on December 21st, 2012.  Oh wait…did you mean, like, career wise?

MW: Do you think there will be a Silent Night, Zombie Night 2?

CG: I don’t see why not – in fact, I think it’s a great idea!  Show how people have adapted the holiday in the wake of a zombie apocalypse.  I’m thinking that people might stop celebrating Easter, though, what with the whole not wanting to celebrate resurrection anymore.

 

MW: What would you like to say in closing?

CG: I really enjoyed working with Sean and would be really happy to work with him again.  It was a great experience.

Interview done by Michael Wilkerson

MW: Please introduce yourself?

LT: Hello my name is Lew Temple, I play Jeffrey Hannigan in the movie.

 

MW: How did you become a part of Silent Night, Zombie Night?

LT: The writer/director Sean Cain, I have been friends for quite some time. I worked in his first short film in Texas, SOUTH OF HEAVEN. We have remained close, and have been supporters of each other’s careers since then. He sent me the script, and asked if I would be interested in doing the role, and I of course was happy to be involved. I thought this project was very well structured in story-telling as well, and wanted to do a role that was like Jeffrey. I am a big fan of Sean’s, and will continue to support his work whenever possible.

 

MW: Tell me about a day on Silent Night, Zombie Night?

LT: My days on set were limited to just two I believe. Each was well organized with a shot list, and very good art direction. Things ran fairly smooth on my work days, of course when Zombie action came into to play, the world changed, and the special effects makeup team was hustling. I am sure that Tom and his team were running on empty tanks by the end of the shoot. I was so very impressed with the level of commitment made by those portraying the Zombies. I think that Sean deserves a lot of credit in that he gave each Zombie a bit of a character arc, a personality, and that gave folks something to work with, rather than just a stumbling bunch of post human mass.

 

MW: Give me a story from the set of Silent Night, Zombie Night?

LT: On one afternoon, I sat and had lunch with Luke Thompson; we had a very nice visit. After lunch, I had a scene where I am attacked by a Zombie, and it was Luke (Wal-Mart Zombie). I had no idea it was him, until after our scene. It was a total transformation. Very funny at some point I realized I had had a lovely conversation with the fellow who then would have me for lunch…

 

MW: What do you think of the craze of zombie movies? Do you think there is to many of them?

LT: I think that Zombie movies, Television, and the zombie culture in general mirror our society today. With the economic downturn, we are all just trying to survive, with what little we have. It can be desperate times, so I feel folks are closely connected to that primal instinct, and also to the anger of, how did this happen to me? I also feel as if people are able to just relax and let their imaginations run while watching, so, no I don’t think there are too many Zombie movies. I would like to see a vehicle that related to the Zombie lifestyle, as we somehow all co-existed, and Zombies were struggling to get by like the rest of us (similar to the DVD extras in Trailer Park of Terror). I prefer Zombies to Cheerleaders. However put the two together, and now you have got my attention.

 

MW: What other movies are you known for?

LT: Most recently and critically, Unstoppable and Rango.  I have also been seen by fans of this genre, most notably in The Devil’s Rejects, Halloween, The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Begging, and House. I also am very fond of Waitress and Domino.

 

MW: What is on tap for the future?

LT: I have The Wettest County coming out soon, directed by John Hillcoat (The Proposition and The Road), starring Tom Hardy, Jessica Chastain, Shia Lebouf and Guy Pearce. I also have another Zombie film, Zombex, with Malcolm McDowell and Sid Haig. And Saving Lincoln, a very well done historical piece on Mr. Lincoln, no vampire though. And I am hoping for some participation in a couple of big films this coming spring, and Nothing Major, a television show I have built.

 

MW: Have you been to any horror conventions to promote Silent Night, Zombie Night?

LT: I was in Kansas City in September. I was getting the word out as best I could. I have not really been on the horror convention circuit this year, as I have been working.  I am thinking that the fans will be excited for both Halloween and Christmas on this film.

 

MW: Do you think there will be a Silent Night, Zombie Night 2?

LT: I would say yes, if Sean has the time with his schedule. He should consider bringing everyone back as a Zombie, and spend a Holiday in Hawaii.

 

MW: What would you like to say in closing?
LT: I really am impressed with this film, its storytelling, special effects, and heart. It really has a love story, and some sensitivity. Of course all the good stuff that comes with flesh eating creatures is also apparent in full. I love the subtlety of the film in both its humor and drama. I was very happy to have the opportunity to do the type of thing that Silent Night, Zombie Night allowed me to do. It gives me a good feeling to see all of us get together on the holidays. You know, it’s Christmas.

Interview done by Michael Wilkerson

MW: Please introduce yourself?
JF: Jack Forcinito. I played the role of  Frank Talbot.

MW: How did you become a part of Silent Night, Zombie Night?
JF: One day while sitting at home twit tiling my thumbs I got a call from  my good friend Sean Cain who had recently produced a short film that I had worked on with another very talent filmmaker and good friend of ours Jim Wright who was also the DP on SNZN.  Sean told me he had acquired financing for a feature he had written and was going to direct and that he wanted me to play one of the main characters, Frank Talbot.  He briefly described to me what kind of a project it was and what it was about and told me he’d send me a script. I asked him what kind of a guy my character was.  He said, basically the guy is you. All you have to do is play yourself.  After I read the script I thought to myself this character of Frank is kind of a dick.  Then I remembered how my good friend Sean had described the character to me and I thought, Hum, Ok?

MW: Tell me about a day on Silent Night, Zombie Night?

JF: ……Long hours, nice people, good food, and lots of fun.

MW: What do you think of the craze of zombie movies? Do you think there is to many of them?
JF: I personally enjoy them myself, a good one that is…… As far as there being to many of them it’s like any other genre I suppose.  As long as you can come up with unique interesting stories and characters and not just some cookie cutter copy of whatever’s  hot at the time there will always be room for more.

MW: Do you think there will be a Silent Night, Zombie Night 2?
JF: I hope so. It would be nice if there was enough interest out there that there might actually be a demand for it.   Also Sean is an unbelievably talented filmmaker. I’d love to see what he could create if he actually had a sizable budget to work with.

Interview done by Michael Wilkerson

MW: Please introduce yourself?
SC: I’m Sean Cain. Writer/Director of Silent Night, Zombie Night and the upcoming film with Jason (“Clerks 2”, “Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back”) Mewes, “Breath of Hate.”

MW: How did Silent Night, Zombie Night become a reality?
SC: I had wanted to do another movie for a while after my first film, “Naked Beneath the Water” came out in 2008. Luckily, I met Wes Laurie who was writing horror reviews for a website and interviewed me soon after the DVD was released. Although I didn’t know it at the time his “interviews” served a two-fold purpose because he also wanted to make a movie. The only difference was that he had some money. He told me later that I was the only one who was ready to pull the trigger. Everyone else was talk, talk, talk.

MW: Do you feel Silent Night, Zombie Night came out the way you wanted to?
SC: There were some things I wanted to do to enhance the scope of the universe we created. A bigger ending, some more action in the beginning, but I had to cut back due to the budget. However, I am quite pleased with the result anyway. Unlike a Hollywood type film there wasn’t anyone over my shoulder telling me it needed to be more this way or that way. I had full creative control. So, if it sucks then it’s all my fault!

MW: Tell the readers about Silent Night, Zombie Night?
SC: The film is like 28 Days Later meets Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. It’s about two guys who start out pissed off at each other and ready to go their separate ways, but are thrown back together after the zombie apocalypse happens. There’s also a love triangle because the one guy’s wife joins them who the other guy has been secretly in love with for years. It’s like a Lifetime movie with a bunch of machete choppin’, gun slingin’ action! The perfect date night flick for you and the little lady!

MW: What made you decide to do a horror film?
SC: Well, I always liked horror/sci-fi stuff like zombie movies, but I didn’t grow up on slasher stuff like Friday the 13th. In fact, I didn’t watch that stuff until I was in my 30’s. I think horror was a genre that I could do at a low budget and still have people interested in. As far as I’m concerned the zombie part is what I call the ‘shiny box.’ A film could be zombies, samurai warriors, cowboys or whichever. It’s about the story I want to tell within that ‘box’ which is important to me. So, while “Silent Night, Zombie Night” seems like some goofball movie about a killer zombie Santa there’s a lot more going on. Don’t get me wrong, I love to be able to scare folks and have lots of action, but it’s the story and characters that mean the most to me. If that happens to take place within a horror setting then all the better.

MW: Give me a story from the set of Silent Night, Zombie Night?
SC: The craziest moment from the film would be when we were overrun by actual L.A.P.D. cops. We were on the street and our heroes are racing back to the house as their comrades are under attack from those naughty little zombies. So, Jack Forcinito and Andy Hopper are running around with shotguns and I guess some neighbor thought gangbangers were up to no good. I’m in the house getting ready and suddenly I hear this helicopter loudspeaker say,  “Get on the sidewalk and put your hands on your head.” Well, this being Los Angeles I wasn’t too concerned because there are helicopters flying all over all the time. My first thought was, ‘Great! Gangbangers are running around and going to cause us problems!’ Well, as soon as I go outside I see my whole cast and crew lined up on the sidewalk. The helicopter overhead and three cop cars come racing up. Luckily we had our permits and the police quickly realized, after seeing the zombies, we were making a movie.

MW: What would you like to say in closing?
SC: If you like zombie films or films in general that do more than just kill a bunch of cookie cutter teenagers then I think you’ll enjoy “Silent Night, Zombie Night.” And even better, you can watch it with your girlfriend! Time after time I’ve lent screener copies to lady friends of mine and they all say the same thing, “At first I didn’t want to watch some crappy zombie film, but you had me crying by the end!” Thank god for sappy females!!